The World Cup’s climate impact, a win for Native Americans and the start of COP15

News to know in our bi-weekly digest

A Native American member of the Yurok Peoples wraps up his fishing on the Klamath River in the U.S. Beau Finley, Flickr
2 December 2022
Ming Chun Tang
2 December 2022
Ming Chun Tang

Qatar says it’s hosting the world’s first carbon-neutral World Cup, but do the facts stack up?

In this Landscape News round-up, we scrutinize the 500 daily flights shuttling football fans in and out of Doha, marvel at Japan’s recyclable houses, and assess the world’s latest disease outbreak.         

LANDSCAPE NEWS

Coffee grown by the community of Punik Village in Indonesia's Sumbawa Regency. Donny Iqbal, CIFOR-ICRAF
Coffee grown by the community of Punik Village in Indonesia’s Sumbawa Regency. Donny Iqbal, CIFOR-ICRAF

Next week is GLF Value Chains Week – a special week of inspiring videos, live streams, launches and more about how to build sustainable value chains around food, forests and finance.

Join us on Tuesday, 6 December at 16:30 GMT to learn how Africa’s supply chains can benefit from USD 2 billion in new funding. Then on Wednesday, 7 December at 12:00 GMT, we’ll explore how companies are protecting one of the world’s most valuable crops: coffee.

At GLF Climate last month, we hosted the launch of a new set of standards to protect the rights of Indigenous Peoples, local communities and Afro-descendant Peoples. Read more about it here.

And in our guest column, a PhD researcher reflects on a tricky field trip to rural Indonesia and the perks of bringing a baby along.

CLIMATE

The city of Doha, which is hosting the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Gilbert Sopakuwa, Flickr
The city of Doha, which is hosting the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Gilbert Sopakuwa, Flickr

Qatar has one of the world’s largest per capita carbon footprints – and the World Cup host country is facing some worrying climate impacts already.

Speaking of which, this summer’s European heatwave may have caused more than 20,000 excess deaths across the continent.

COP27 was a missed opportunity to phase out fossil fuels, delegates say. And despite the largest climate finance deal yet, the world will need another USD 1 trillion to adapt to the climate crisis.

That funding may come too late for nomadic herders in Mongolia and rural communities in Chile, who face a seemingly endless series of droughts.

PEOPLE

Two years in the making, a lawsuit spearheaded by climate activist Greta Thunberg is one of the largest that the Swedish legal system has ever faced. Streetsblog Denver, Flickr
Two years in the making, a lawsuit spearheaded by climate activist Greta Thunberg is one of the largest that the Swedish legal system has ever faced. Streetsblog Denver, Flickr

Could this 300-year-old wheat in a London museum solve the global hunger crisis? Scientists are looking into whether the ancient grain might be better suited to today’s hotter world.

Air pollution is one of the main causes of stillbirths, accounting for nearly almost a million each year across Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Climate lawsuits are heating up: Greta Thunberg and 600 other young people are now suing Sweden’s new government for climate inaction.

What if you could pack up your house and bring it with you? Here’s what Japan’s “recyclable” wooden houses can teach us about making our buildings more sustainable.

PLANET

The World Cup’s climate impact, a win for Native Americans and the start of COP15
A boat collecting dead swans from the River Severn after the swan sanctuary at Worcester was hit by Avian Flu, 2020. Tony Armstrong-Sly, Flickr

One virus, millions dead. Sound familiar? Here’s all you need to know as the world goes through its worst-ever bird flu outbreak.

The Great Barrier Reef should be added to the list of World Heritage Sites in danger, says a new report from UNESCO. Australia disagrees.

In a major win for Native American communities, the U.S. has approved the world’s largest dam demolition and river restoration project, which will create hundreds of kilometers of new salmon habitat.

From Velcro to bullet trains, there’s a long list of inventions inspired by the natural world. Here are five of them for the future.

BUSINESS

The World Cup’s climate impact, a win for Native Americans and the start of COP15
The U.S.’s only operational lithium source, where special lithium hydroxide grades are produced. CGOBT/INPE, Flickr

China’s USD 300 billion green bond market is one of the world’s largest, but where is the money really being invested?

Solar-powered cars are starting to hit the road, but they’ll do little to alleviate the world’s lithium shortages or protect Indonesia’s rainforests from nickel mining.

Patagonia is now donating all of its profits to combat the climate crisis. Here’s how the company is setting an example for the future of capitalism.

POLICY

A food market in the South Korean city of Pyeongtaek. Craig Rohn, Flickr
A food market in the South Korean city of Pyeongtaek. Craig Rohn, Flickr

Next week, world leaders and scientists will descend on Montreal for the COP15 biodiversity summit. As the sixth mass extinction beckons, the pressure is on for them to finally set in motion a new framework for protecting Earth’s species.

Canada has announced its first-ever national climate adaptation strategy, while Brazil is seeking help from the U.S., U.K., France and other rich countries to protect the Amazon rainforest.

Big polluters have received EUR 98.5 billion in free carbon permits from the E.U. over the past nine years – more than the amount they paid for their emissions.

South Korea recycles all of its food waste. What lessons can it teach the rest of the world?

This article is focused on value chains in support of the work of the Food Systems, Land Use and Restoration Impact Program (FOLUR), with funding from the Global Environment Facility.


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